Recent News

Regularly posted news and announcements that matter to you.

US Dressage Finals High Score Breed Awards

The American Warmblood Registry is proud to participate in the US Dressage Finals High Score Breed Awards.  The high score breed awards are a valuable opportunity for additional recognition available at the 2023 US Dressage Finals, to be held on November 9-12, 2023 at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, KY.

This is a national, head-to-head competition that showcases competitors in adult amateur and open divisions, at Training Level through Grand Prix, and junior/young riders at Training Level through Fourth Level.

 

FEI – WBFSH World Breeding Dressage Championships 2023

FINAL RESULTS

SATURDAY August 5th:

 FINAL 5YO HORSES:
1st place – Quinn G (Quaterhit x Fassbinder) & Betina Jaeger2nd place – No Limit (Geniaal x Florestan) & Simone Pearce3rd place – Beck’s (Benicio x Desperados) & Thomas Schulze

SUNDAY August 6th:

FINAL 7YO HORSES
1st place – Danciero (Dancier x Floriscount) & Anna Kasprzak2nd place – Global Player OLD (Grand Galaxy Win T x Blue Hors Don Schufro)& Leonie Richter3rd place – Lightning Star (Ferguson x De Niro) & Kirsten Brouwer

FINAL 6YO HORSES
1st place – My Toto (Glock’s Toto Jr. x Voice) & Hans Peter Minderhoud2nd place – Vitalos FRH (Vitalis x De Niro) & Leonie Richter3rd place – Zuperman OLD (Galleria’s Vincent Maranello x Destano)& Beatrice Hoffrogge

 FINAL 5YO HORSES:
1st place – Quinn G (Quaterhit x Fassbinder) & Betina Jaeger2nd place – No Limit (Geniaal x Florestan) & Simone Pearce3rd place – Beck’s (Benicio x Desperados) & Thomas Schulze

SUNDAY August 6th:

FINAL 7YO HORSES
1st place – Danciero (Dancier x Floriscount) & Anna Kasprzak2nd place – Global Player OLD (Grand Galaxy Win T x Blue Hors Don Schufro)& Leonie Richter3rd place – Lightning Star (Ferguson x De Niro) & Kirsten Brouwer

FINAL 6YO HORSES
1st place – My Toto (Glock’s Toto Jr. x Voice) & Hans Peter Minderhoud2nd place – Vitalos FRH (Vitalis x De Niro) & Leonie Richter3rd place – Zuperman OLD (Galleria’s Vincent Maranello x Destano)& Beatrice Hoffrogge

Here are the WCYH full results

World Equestrian Center – Ocala Chosen to Host  Longines League of Nations™ 2024 Qualifier

 

August 1, 2023 – Ocala, FL – Organizers from the World Equestrian Center – Ocala (WEC) in Ocala, FL, are proud to announce that the venue has been chosen by the Fédération Equestre International (FEI) as the only North American site of the Longines League of Nations™ qualifier for 2024 through 2027. The qualifier is one of only four events in the world as part of the Longines League of Nations™, which will be held on March 20-24, 2024, as part of the CSIO5* internationally rated competition week during the 2024 Winter Spectacular Show Series.

WEC – Ocala was one of 18 organizers from Europe, North America and the Middle East to bid to host a qualifier of the newly created Longines League of Nations™, which launches in 2024 as the world’s preeminent series in team Jumping. The Longines League of Nations is a fresh start for the century-old equestrian team series and features a unified and global format where the top 10 nations compete at four incredible venues in order to qualify for a Final. Other venues that will host Longines League of Nations qualifiers include Abu Dhabi (UAE), St. Gallen (SUI) and Rotterdam (NED), while the final will be held in Barcelona (ESP).

The Longines League of Nations consists of a two-round format where all four athletes from all 10 teams participate with the three best scores to count, followed by a second round where the best eight teams compete in reverse order with only three athletes per team and no drop score.

Learn more at wec.net.

Media Contact:
Candace FitzGerald
[email protected]

Foreign Equestrians in US National Events Required to Join USEF, Undergo SafeSport Training

Foreign Equestrians in US National Events Required to Join USEF   Undergo Safe Sport Training as of Sept. 1

Dressage News – May 31, 2023

Foreign participants in U.S. national events will be required to join the U.S. federation as competing members and undergo Safe Sport training effective Sept. 1.
The new rule adopted by the USEF board of directors does not apply to participants in FEI (International Equestrian Federation) events.
The federation said in a statement the new requirement replaces the policy that foreign participants needed only to demonstrate good standing with their national federation.
The aim of the change was “to strive for an environment that is safe for our participants and that is free from abuse.”
USEF aims “to ensure all participants are properly trained in abuse prevention,” the statement said. “Awareness of abuse prevention, how to recognize abuse, and how to report abuse is critical to our goal to safeguard our participants.”

Foreign participation in the U.S. has grown significantly in the past decade with about 35 riders representing other countries competing at the Global Dressage Festival in Wellington, Florida last winter.

 

 

The Olympics and FEI Events Welcome Thoroughbreds

 

“At next year’s Paris Olympic Games, Thoroughbreds competing in any of the equestrian disciplines – dressage, show jumping and eventing – will, for the first time, be recognized in the starting lists and results. In past Olympics, the retired thoroughbred racehorses competing were listed only as ‘breeding unknown’.”

Please read the entire Press Release here

Big, Scopey and Rideable Never Goes out of Style

For the Upcoming 2023 Breeding Season We Recommend the Warmblood Stallion

TAMERINO,

FEI Grand Prix Show Jumper with an impressive record at major competitions in Europe and the US.

                   

His sire, the famous Voltaire, maintained top spots in the World Showjumping Sire Rankings for years.
Like his sire, Tamerino is an excellent stallion for hunter breeding. Tamerino’s dam Bianca III is from the famous Holsteiner line 4847.
Full pedigree available at TAMERINO | HorseTelex.

                                                 

 

 

 

 

Scientists, Federations Applaud FEI Whisker Shaving Ban

The Horse asked researchers and equestrian federation representatives for their takes on the new FEI rule banning shaving of facial vibrissae, which are sensory organs commonly called “whiskers.”

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA

Removing long facial hairs that help horses “see” their close surroundings could deprive them of a safety mechanism and possibly make them feel disoriented. As such, the recent decision of the Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI) to ban removal of horses’ “sensory hairs”—the whiskers around the mouth and eyes—constitutes an important move to safeguard equine welfare, according to equine veterinary researchers and industry leaders.

“The move by the FEI to ban the trimming of equine whiskers is to be applauded,” said Roly Owers, MRCVS, CEO of World Horse Welfare, in Norfolk, U.K., an international charity partnering with the Removing long facial hairs that help horses “see” their close surroundings could deprive them of a safety mechanism and possibly make them feel disoriented. As such, the recent decision of the Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI) to ban removal of horses’ “sensory hairs”—the whiskers around the mouth and eyes—constitutes an important move to safeguard equine welfare, according to equine veterinary researchers and industry leaders.

“The move by the FEI to ban the trimming of equine whiskers is to be applauded,” said Roly Owers, MRCVS, CEO of World Horse Welfare, in Norfolk, U.K., an international charity partnering with the FEI on welfare matters for more than 30 years. “Whiskers, or vibrissae, play an important sensory role in protecting the muzzle and eyes of the horse and, hence, removing them because it looks neat is completely unjustifiable.”

Horses appear to rely on sensory hairs for judging how close their heads are to objects, especially when they’re so close they can’t see in front of their noses, since their eyes are on the sides of their heads, said Machteld van Dierendonck, PhD, who’s associated with the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at Utrecht University, the Netherlands.

“All vibrissae are a kind of safety measure, not only above the eye (where horses have seven vibrissae on each side, including a ‘very, very long one’ nearest the nose),” van Dierendonck said. “Because a horse is not able to ’see’ under his nose, he ‘sees’ with his vibrissae.

“In a domestic stable environment, they need their vibrissae much more than in a natural environment, since there are many more obstacles—doors, grids, stable sides, buckets, etc.—than they would ever encounter in the wild,” she continued. Her review of previously collected data even suggested that horses with shortened vibrissae might have had a slightly greater tendency to incur more head injuries than those with intact vibrissae, she said.

Federations on Board To Stop Whisker Cutting

The FEI sought to “align its regulations with those of National Federations (Germany, Switzerland, France) which had already banned this practice,” said Hall. “We were pleased with the support the rule received through the Rules Revision process in the lead up to the November vote at the FEI Online General Assembly,” she told The Horse.

During that revision process, the German Federation encouraged the FEI to include a ban on clipping ear hairs as well—which is also illegal in Germany—but the FEI opted to keep ear hairs out of the ban for the moment. That’s “not surprising,” said Owers, who explained that ear hairs are “not whiskers” and “do not perform the same function” of providing sensory details about nearby objects. “The key issue with clipping/trimming hair around the ear is how well the horse responds to that—and, hence, what risk is posed to horse and trimmer,” he said.

Meanwhile, the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) expressed concern that the rules outlining the new FEI ban were “too subjective” and would be difficult to enforce, especially with regard to how much hair might have been clipped. “Since clipping the sensory hairs results in disqualification, is it to be understood that any trimming or shortening of these hairs would cause disqualification?” the Federation’s representatives wrote to the FEI during the rules revision process. USEF additionally stated that long hairs around the eyes could get tangled in blinders used during driving competitions, causing the horse discomfort. However, the FEI assured that this would not be an issue and that the ban’s wording should remain as is.

Ultimately, member nations voted unanimously to implement the rule, the FEI stated.

Despite its original concerns, USEF supports the ban, said Will Connell, USEF director of sport. “The ban on the shaving of sensory hairs already exists in a number of European countries, so for athletes that have been competing internationally, this will not present a huge change,” he said. “USEF did raise a question in response to the initial rule proposal, but the safeguards around the rule are sufficient should there be an issue relating to driving blinkers. USEF will now work to make sure all U.S. FEI athletes are aware of the restriction.”

Sensory Hair Science and Paying Attention to Horse Behavior

Ultimately, cutting off sensory hairs impairs equine welfare purely for aesthetic purposes, and the FEI ban “makes this very clear,” Owers. But protecting FEI competition horses is only part of the effort. “It is even more important to educate owners to understand the sensory role that whiskers perform,” he said.

Even so, little research has been carried out on equine whiskers, said Marianne Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ECEIM, Specialist KNMvD Equine Internal Medicine, in Utrecht University’s Department of Equine Sciences. “More work has been done on rats,” she said, mainly because it’s difficult to run reliable, ethical studies on whisker shaving in horses.

…….

To test whisker function in horses, von Dierendonck and her students found that horses with clipped whiskers generally bumped their noses against the bottom of shortened buckets (not the depth the horses expected), but horses with intact whiskers didn’t. They also saw that, especially in younger horses, the animals seemed to lose their balance and sense of orientation for about a half hour after having their whiskers experimentally shaved off. However, because it’s nearly impossible to “blind” the researchers observing the horses (hiding from them which horses were shaved and which weren’t, to avoid bias), the study results haven’t been scientifically validated, she said.